Failed Total Shoulder Arthroplasty

Failed Total Shoulder Arthroplasty

This illustration was commissioned for Arthroscopically Assisted Conversion of Total Shoulder Arthroplasty to Hemiarthroplasty With Glenoid Bone Grafting by Surena Namdari, MD, MSc; and David Glaser, MD for publication in ORTHOPEDICS October 2011 issue (ORTHOPEDICS November 2011;34(11):862).

Aseptic loosening of the glenoid component after total shoulder arthroplasty presents a considerable treatment challenge in the setting of substantial glenoid bone loss.  Glenoid component explantation and bone grafting of defects has become a common methods of recreating bone stock in hopes of preventing later fractures, maintaining joint kinematics, and allowing for later glenoid reimplantation if necessary.  While this has been traditionally accomplished via open techniques, we describe an arthroscopic-assisted method of glenoid explantation and bone grafting for cases of aseptic glenoid loosening with contained bone defects.

Patellar Instability

Patellar Instability

According to Dr. Hu Xu of the Department of Orthopedics, Xijing Hospital, proximal soft-tissue realignment is the main surgical intervention for recurrent patellar instability. In recent years, all-inside arthroscopic procedures or mini-open surgeries comes to replace traditional operations which have more associated morbidity and poor cosmetic results. In this article (ORTHOPEDICS July 2011;34(7):524), Xu and his colleagues report a very simple and all-inside arthroscopic technique for the operative treatment of recurrent patellar instability. Using two epidural needles in several steps and no accessory portals required, the medial patellar retinaculum is imbricated to the desired tension. The combination of lateral release and medial retinacular placation obviously improves the patellar tracking compared with pre-operation.

Infant Thermometer Position

Infant Thermometer Position

Vicks Gentle Touch Behind the Ear Thermometer: Illustrations for instructions for use and positioning.

The Vicks Gentle Touch Behind Ear thermometer is set to revolutionise the way body temperature is taken in infants and children. With a simple touch, the thermometer is gentle enough to be used without waking a sleeping infant, while providing accurate measurements in one second.

The Vicks Gentle Touch Behind Ear thermometer uses a novel heat flow technique to measure the temperature of the blood carotid artery which runs behind the ear, bringing blood to the brain and hypothalamus (the temperature-regulating gland) and so accurately reflecting core body temperature.

A revolution in the way to take temperature: it measures the temperature from behind earlobe

  • Gentle: it measures temperature by simply touching behind ear lobe with a soft ring
  • Accurate: clinically proven
  • Accuracy: ± 0.2°C
  • Fast: only 1 sec. reading
  • Special sensor detects heathflow through the skin
  • Fever Insight® Feature: color-coded temperature display
  • Memory function: tracks last 8 measurements
  • Featuring a washable ring for extra hygiene
The Modified Lapidus Procedure

The Modified Lapidus Procedure

This illustration shows a technique described by Romain Gérard, MD, Richard Stern, MD, and Mathieu Assal, MD from the Orthopaedic Surgery Service, University Hospital of Geneva, Switzerland for the March 2008 issue of Orthopedics. This technique is valuable for providing a powerful and durable correction of metatarsus primus varus and hallux valgus, and careful attention to the details should help in achieving a successful outcome while avoiding complications.

 

Pneumococcal Infection

Pneumococcal Infection

The purpose of this illustration is to represent the anatomical systems of the body attacked by S. Pneumoniae, a bacteria which causes various diseases and infections, especially in young children of Third-World countries.  The systems portrayed are the respiratory, nasopharyngeal, and circulatory systems. These systems are easily infected by this bacteria, causing illnesses such as pneumonia and sepsis.  This image is used for public awareness and education.

Title:         Systems of Pneumococcal Infection
Medium:       Graphite Pencil, Adobe Photoshop
Format:     Poster or PR presentation
Client:         PneumoADIP, JHU Bloomberg School of Public Health
Audience:      General public

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